Archive for the ‘dog sledding’ Category

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We’re moving to our new domain!!!

July 9, 2009

So exciting, we have finally matured from a blog to a website! I feel so grown-up! Please don’t desert us, follow this link and we’ll continue where we left off…

www.xtremesport4u.com

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Extreme racing with dogs – The Iditarod

December 2, 2008

A different kind of marathon we suggest – this one of some 1,150 miles to be completed in little over two weeks, in the United States’ most north western state, Alaska – yet another example of the extreme and extraordinary things that people will do – why we find ourselves asking. But first a little more about the race.

From Anchorage, in south central Alaska, to Nome on the western Bering Sea coast, each team of 12 to 16 dogs and their ‘musher’ cover over 1,150 miles. It has been called the “Last Great Race on Earth” and it has won worldwide acclaim and interest.

The Iditarod Trail, now a National Historic Trail, had its beginnings as a mail and supply route from the coastal towns of Seward and Knik to the interior mining camps at Flat, Ophir, Ruby and beyond to the west coast communities of Unalakleet, Elim, Golovin, White Mountain and Nome. Mail and supplies went in. Gold came out. All via dog sled. Heroes were made, legends were born.

The 2009 race will start on March 7th in downtown Anchorage and depending on your speed over the course will finish 10 to 17 days later and will conclude with the awards banquet on March 22nd in Nome.

2009 Race Route

Checkpoints

Distance between Checkpoints

Distance from Anchorage

Distance to Nome

Total Distance

1131

Anchorage to Campbell Airstrip

20

20

1131

Campbel Airstrip to Willow

29

49

1082

Willow to Yentna Station

52

115

1016

Yentna Station to Skwentna

34

149

982

Skwentna to Finger Lake

45

194

937

Finger Lake to Rainy Pass

30

224

907

Rainy Pass to Rohn

48

272

859

Rohn to Nikolai

75

347

784

Nikolai to McGrath

54

401

730

McGrath to Takotna

18

419

712

Takotna to Ophir

25

444

687

Ophir to Iditarod

90

534

597

Iditarod to Shageluk

65

599

532

Shageluk to Anvik

25

624

507

Anvik to Grayling

18

642

489

Grayling to Eagle Island

60

702

429

Eagle Island to Kaltag

70

772

359

Kaltag to Unalakleet

90

862

269

Unalakleet to Shaktoolik

40

902

229

Shaktoolik to Koyuk

58

960

171

Koyuk to Elim

48

1008

123

Elim to Golovin

28

1036

95

Golovin to White Mountain

18

1054

77

White Mountain to Safety

55

1109

22

Safety to Nome

22

1131

0

For further information on rules and how you can qualify go to the Itarod home website www.itarod.com
We include for your interest a video from DiscoveryNetworks which gives you a taste of ‘The Greatest Race on Earth’.

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Why limit yourself to just ski-ing? or just snowboarding for that matter?

November 25, 2008

‘Just’ skiing did I say? There’s nothing ‘just’ about skiing. It is one of the most exhilarating sports in the world I think… although my son would beg to differ – his choice would probably be snowboarding or kite surfing.

But back to my question… why limit yourself to just skiing? With mountain regions becoming accessible to anyone with snowchains, resorts are getting more and more imaginative and offering more and more things to do for all adrenaline junkies out there.

Take COLORADO for example. We all know that some of the best skiing in North America can be found there. After all, they are lucky enough to have the whole spine of the Rocky Mountains running through their state. But this fabulous area now has a lot more to offer.

You can now dogsled at Snowmass, snowshoe hike at Bear Lake, four-wheel all-terrain Jeep ice race on frozen Georgetown Lake, climb frozen waterfalls at Ouray Ice Park … to name just a few alternatives. When it comes to extreme sports and the ultimate adrenaline rush, I think Colorado has most things covered come Summer or Winter.

You can actually dogsled at many other places besides Snowmass – that was just my first example, try Breckinbridge, Copper Mountain, Frisco, Winter Park, Vail, Beaver Creek, Durango to name just a few.

Dog Sledding at Sunset

Then you can four-wheel, all-terrain Jeep ice race on frozen Georgetown Lake. When most other people park their toys in a garage in the winter, some in the Snow Belt don’t –  they screw on studs and hit the lake!  BRadOO7 put this video on to show us all what it’s about.

What’s next? Climbing frozen waterfalls… The Ouray Ice Park is a 2 mile long stretch of the Uncompagre Gorge that has been designated for public ice climbing.Thanks to bwadeocra.

But you could also go to East Vail and climb their 120 ft free standing pillar of ice – fondly nicknamed ‘The Fang’. Routes on this climb are prime examples of technical ice climbing and should only be attempted by the knowledgeable and well-trained. This enormous ice pillar forms from the cascading waterfall only in exceptionally cold winters. It can be up to 50 m high (120 ft) and has been known to have a base measuring 8 m wide.

You could also, of course, do a spot of snowshoe hiking. Snowshoeing can be the perfect escape – if you are desperate to experience some much-needed peace and quiet… or just a wild day out with friends. Try Bear Lake and Wild Basin. These two areas are particularly popular with the big shoeprint set, thanks to DrOfWax for the video. Most other areas of the park could be considered “ski mountaineering” rather than “ski touring” with steep climbs and descents, narrow routes and sharp turns. This area is also suitable for cross country ski-ing.

And then of course there are other such arbitary things as para-gliding, heli-skiing, back country skiing etc. to take in.

I started this article on the derogatory lines of “Why limit yourself to just skiing” and I will end it on a video from XTremeVideo to show that there is no such thing as “just skiing”…